Shooting after Dark

Out with the Camera

So with the dark winter evenings upon us, trying to capture landscape photography can be fun when it comes to looking through that viewfinder or seeing details on your screen display due to the sky being dark and overcast this time of year. With the lack of light in the mornings or after 4pm in the evenings (UK time) you ask yourself why not just stay indoors with my camera and wait for spring.

Well here’s why!

Heath Lake after Dark

Heath Lake after Dark

I for one am still new to photography and after seeing other peoples images of Nightscape photography, I decided to get out during the evenings and try-out taking photos in the dark. The above image was taken between the hours of the only 7pm – 8pm so not that late and using the Bulb setting on my Nikon D7000 took approximately 12 minutes to capture.

So was it easy? No without a torch I couldn’t see a bloody thing (so lesson one learned, always take a torch) looking across the lake all I could see where lights from the houses on the other side of the lake, the sky and the trees were just a dark outline. Looking through the viewfinder or on-screen display seemed to view and pick up even less than what my eyes had adjusted too, this made setting up the composition and depth of field great fun NOT!

However after finally setting up my camera to what I was hoping would look ok, I took to take my first shot, 5min exposure just came out pitch black so I increased to 10 minutes etc, and finally, I managed to capture the above image.

Next trip out saw me setting up my camera a little better, and taking my first shot using an exposure time starting at 20 minutes using an ISO setting of 100 with a f/14 – 16 stop, different location this time with cloud and skies not so good, but still happy with the final outcome in the end

ISO 100, f/16, 25min (bulb)

ISO 100, f/16, 25min (bulb)

So go on, get outside with your camera in the evenings. Yes, people will look at you as if you are strange, and yes getting the image you picture within your own head is not going to be easy. However what you learn and the skills you gain will pay off in the end

 

 

 

 

Night Photography

Out with the Camera

Taking photographs at night just after the sun has gone down and the stars have started to come out, is a great time to learn and practice both Nightscape and Long-Exposure Photography

As you still have enough natural light to see what you are doing and set up your camera before it gets too dark, and you can practice taking photos above 30sec without the use of an ND filter

Night Photography

Taking photos at night

One thing I learned whilst trying out night photography, and that’s don’t forget your torch as the light just goes so quickly, I was lucky as the D7000 comes with a backlight option. Without this option I wouldn’t of had a clue what my camera was set to on the display lol!!!

I took the above image with my D7000 setup on a tripod and used my shutter release cable to fire the shot, once again setting my camera to manual and using bulb the shot was taken using my iPhone as a stopwatch.

Camera Settings:

Manual Mode, ISO 100, 121sec, F4 at 12mm

Playing with Long Exposure

Camera skills

Long Exposure photography so what is it? well, everything I’ve read so far points Long Exposure photography being anything that requires and tripod, as the shutter speed time is too long to take a photo holding the camera by hand without taking a totally blurred and out of focus photograph. The photo can also show a lot of movement in items such as clouds and light.

To take such a photograph as the one below, you have two camera setting options you can use. Option 1 M (manual) Option 2 S (Shutter Priority) both settings allow you to control the shutter speed and therefore increasing the time taken to capture the image,

Photograph of Halo Moon

Trying to photograph a halo moon

I’m still learning and at this moment in time, I like using Bulb and a stopwatch to set the time taken to capture the photo.

Camera set up, using a tripod to steady the camera I set my Nikon D7000 to Manual and switched autofocus also over to manual. I composed and focused my shot and used my shutter release cable I took the shot.

ISO set to 100 to allow in the lighting required, F/Stop set to f4 as wasn’t 100% sure which f/stop would be best, I took the shot and allowed 120sec before closing the shutter release.