Photography Workshops

Quick update

Here at JustGreatShots Photography, we are happy to announce that we are now offering Photography Workshops

Moving away from AUTO
Understanding Composition
Landscape, photography
Seascape, photography
Long Exposure, photography
Low Light \ Night, photography

Please contact us here at JustGreatShots Photography for more information if you would like to enquire about small group bookings

 

 

Road Trip to Cornwall

Out with the Camera

Short break all booked at the last minute, and we find ourselves heading off down the A3 and following the instruction as provided by our SAT NAV, 5hrs later we arrive at our holiday destination Sea Acres Cornwall, ok not the easiest of locations to get to when following your SAT NAT but a nice little park, friendly with all that you need to enjoy a short break away.

The plan for our week away, to capture the following photos, Tin Mine, Small Finishing Harbour, St. Michaels Mount etc

 

 

Tipner Shipwreck Walk

Out with the Camera

What else could I say apart from YES, when we got invited along on a photography walk to this amazing location, this shipwreck walk had been arranged by my friend Andy Hornby, who also runs a photography workshop group on Facebook?

like a lot of other photographers who live in the Hampshire, we drive past this shipwreck and iconic old crane on our daily commute to work along the M275 Portsmouth.

The photography walk began with a group of 11 photographers all meeting up in a car park at Port Solent, before heading off towards this amazing location, strong winds and heavy rain had been forecast, so it was very hit and miss if this walk would take place, but with our cameras at the ready, we started shooting images whilst watching the sun going down over this old shipwreck, ok yes at one point the heavens did open but that didn’t put us off taking photos.

Images from this Shipwreck Walk, have been made available to purchase online

 

A trip​ to Bosham Harbour

Out with the Camera

 

It’s the weekend, so that can only mean one thing, and that’s time to get out with our cameras here at JustGreatShots Photography, so after getting an invite to join one of our Facebook Group Members to meet them down at Bosham Harbour, West Sussex.

With camera gear, all packed we headed off back down the A3, we had never taken photographs from this location before and therefore didn’t know what to expect.

On arriving at Bosham Harbour and parking up the car park, we walked down towards the harbour and as photographers, our eyes just went WoW what an amazing location, it has everything to offer the Landscape, Seascape, Long Exposure Photographer.

The plan was to wait around for the sunset, whilst trying our hands at more Long Exposure Photography, and to try out capturing something that little different within the camera by using our LEE Landscape (GR) Graduated Filters set, this set is designed to bring out colours which already exist within the scene (These Filters DO NOT Add Colour which isn’t there)

With Landscape filter kit at the ready, we started trying out different combination of GR and ND filters, with the GR filters pulling out the colours and the ND filters being used to increase our exposure times

The Above Gallery has been captured within Camera using LEE Landscape 100mm Filter set (No Colours Added in Post)

 

 

Long Exposure Photography, Old Portsmouth

Out with the Camera

 

So after beating The Beast from The East on Saturday, we head off out on the Sunday to Southsea, and Old Portsmouth, Hampshire to capture some Long Exposure photography.

With LEE filters at the ready, we head off down the A3 to Portsmouth, after driving around Old Portsmouth we manage to find a Free parking space (not that we are tight) we just didn’t have any change, Parking at Southsea \ Old Portsmouth cost approx £3.00 for 2hrs. with parking charges now in place 7days, 12 months a year unlike in the past, so make sure you check the parking meters when visiting this location.

Walking down the seafront we stop off at the pier, before heading off towards the hot walls at Old Portsmouth which is one of my favorite locations from Long Exposure Photography

On arriving at the jetty, we found it to be free of the fisherman who normally flock to this location for a spot of beach fishing.

With our camera’s set up we started to capture the above photographs using both LEE’s 10Stop (Big Stopper) and LEE’s 15Stop (Supper Stopper) ND Filters.

Exposure times before fitting our LEE filters, where reading around 1/125sec + so capturing Long Exposure photos wouldn’t have been possible by just decreasing our F/stops down to f/22

Example filter times, before and after fitting LEE ND filters

Exposure Time 1\30sec, ISO100, f/11 with 10Stop = 30sec

Exposure Time 1\125sec, ISO100, f/11 with 15Stop = 6mins

 

 

 

Trip to Langstone Harbour

Out with the Camera

 

Today’s trip to Langstone Harbour started with the alarm clock going off at 5am on Saturday, a quick wash, cuppa tea, and the de-icing of my cars windscreen I head off to Langstone Harbour to capture a lovely sunrise!

Upon leaving home and drove down the A3 in low cloud, mist, fog whichever one you call it, I just kept thinking I hope this clears before I get to Langstone and sure enough, it did.

Arriving at Langstone just before 6am I managed to find a parking space within short walking distance of The Royal Oak Pub, and the Old Mill both of which are pictured in the above photo, but the bad news, I arrived to find a patch of low lying cloud which would end my chances of capturing the photograph I had in my Mind.

This cloud wasn’t to spoil my trip, with camera gear at the ready I head off out onto the mud flats, the same mud flats that I had spent a lot of my childhood digging for bait so that I could go sea fishing with my Dad and Grandad. Therefore I know this area well and I know where and where not to walk, which comes in handy along with the knowledge to keep a close eye on the incoming tide which on this day, wasn’t for a good couple of hours, but the tide in this harbour comes in slowly and sneaks up behind you, so before you know it you’re cut off from the mainland.

So if you fancy visiting the area, just remember the above tips before stepping out onto the mud, and always check the tide times.

Am I happy with my overall trip to Langstone Harbour today, did I capture the photographs that I wanted, NO but did I still enjoy being out in the cold on a lovely February morning, boots covered in mud, camera Tri-Pod feet all covered in mud, hands and face feeling the cold with my breath clearly visible everytime I breathed out, hell YES because I was out enjoying taking photographs, and on arriving home 6hrs later whilst drinking a warm cuppa tea, I’m  already planning my next trip?

 

 

 

Our Trip to Portland Bill

Out with the Camera

 

It was that time on a Sunday morning to wake up and grab our camera gear and head off to Portland Bill, Dorset as planned.

This trip wasn’t about capturing a sunrise or sunset, it was all about spending the day capturing long exposure shots using our LEE filter sets. So no need for a crazy early start but alarms went off at 06:30 and by 09:30 we were in Portland, which is a 2hour drive from where we live in Hampshire.

On arriving at Portland Bill, what can I say apart from the wind was blowing and the temperature was around 3c with wind chill factor, the skies where overcast behind us and lovely and blue in front of us.

Let’s just say we had a very mixed bag of weather on this trip, clear skies, rain, and even snow but nothing stop us trying to capture that JustGreatShot

With LEE filters to hand, we started to capture the type of images we had traveled all the way to Portland Bill for, using LEE’s 10stop (Big Stopper) and LEE’s 15Stop (Supper Stopper) ND filters alongside LEE’s Medium grad filters we were able to increase shutter speed exposure times and slowing down \ extending movement without blowing out the sky

The above images were captured at ISO 100, 1/500sec, on F/11, the one on left without LEE’s Supper Stopper fitted, the one on the right with this stopper fitted.

Difference in exposure time between these two images is approximately 2 minutes, which as you can see, makes a lot of difference when capturing Seascapes

Various images captured from our trip to Portland Bill will soon be available to purchase online, in the meantime here is a sample below

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Online SeaScape Gallery coming soon

 

Shooting after Dark

Out with the Camera

So with the dark winter evenings upon us, trying to capture landscape photography can be fun when it comes to looking through that viewfinder or seeing details on your screen display due to the sky being dark and overcast this time of year. With the lack of light in the mornings or after 4pm in the evenings (UK time) you ask yourself why not just stay indoors with my camera and wait for spring.

Well here’s why!

Heath Lake after Dark

Heath Lake after Dark

I for one am still new to photography and after seeing other peoples images of Nightscape photography, I decided to get out during the evenings and try-out taking photos in the dark. The above image was taken between the hours of the only 7pm – 8pm so not that late and using the Bulb setting on my Nikon D7000 took approximately 12 minutes to capture.

So was it easy? No without a torch I couldn’t see a bloody thing (so lesson one learned, always take a torch) looking across the lake all I could see where lights from the houses on the other side of the lake, the sky and the trees were just a dark outline. Looking through the viewfinder or on-screen display seemed to view and pick up even less than what my eyes had adjusted too, this made setting up the composition and depth of field great fun NOT!

However after finally setting up my camera to what I was hoping would look ok, I took to take my first shot, 5min exposure just came out pitch black so I increased to 10 minutes etc, and finally, I managed to capture the above image.

Next trip out saw me setting up my camera a little better, and taking my first shot using an exposure time starting at 20 minutes using an ISO setting of 100 with a f/14 – 16 stop, different location this time with cloud and skies not so good, but still happy with the final outcome in the end

ISO 100, f/16, 25min (bulb)

ISO 100, f/16, 25min (bulb)

So go on, get outside with your camera in the evenings. Yes, people will look at you as if you are strange, and yes getting the image you picture within your own head is not going to be easy. However what you learn and the skills you gain will pay off in the end

 

 

 

 

Aperture Priority Practise around Old Portsmouth

Out with the Camera

So spent the other evening out around Old Portsmouth learning more about using Aperture Priority, so what is Aperture Priority you might ask yourself and what’s it all about.

Aperture Priority on your camera will allow you to set and control the F stop (the amount of light you let into your lens) whilst the camera controls the shutter speed required to capture the photograph.

Anchors Aweigh

ISO 100, 24mm, 1/8sec, f/10

The above image was taken just as the sun said goodnight, which allowed me to capture this anchor silhouette.

Trying out our new Manfrotto 678B Monopod

Camera kit

So finally managed to get out and about this afternoon with the camera and our new Manfrotto 678B Monopod with tilting head. Well, what do we think of this monopod from Manfrotto? To start with it’s like all other Manfrotto kit well made and up for job and even comes with 8yrs warranty, but as it’s so well made I can’t see it being needed 😉

Steep Waterfall

ISO 200, 24mm, 1.0 sec, f/18

Taking photos with a Monopod if you haven’t yet tried one, is just like having a third hand which helps remove that unwanted camera shack without having to set up a tripod. And unlike a tripod, a monopod is just a little more flexible when all your looking for is that extra steady hand when needed. Long-Exposure photographs, however, will still require a Tripod as even the smallest amount of movement could blur out your shot.

Steep Church

ISO 100, 14mm, 1\60 sec f/9

Monopods also work very well with panning and action shots, as they allow a little more free movement with your camera, and a lot lighter than carrying around a tripod on those long walks.